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KEENE, NH 03431
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The Moments Before & After Death

Hugh Elliott wrote, "Death can sneak up on you like a silent kitten, surprising you with it's touch and you have a right to act surprised. Other times death stomps in the front door, unwanted and unannounced, and makes it's noisy way to your seat on the sofa."

Honestly, the experience is different for everyone, as is the way we face the very possibility of our death. We can discover great lessons for those in our lives who are faced with terminal illness, such as humility, acceptance, and the power of compassion to heal old emotional scars. We can also find value in posthumously caring for others, through organ and tissue donation. This section has both practical and insightful reading materials. Should you have questions on anything you find here, please call us.

Organ & Tissue Donation
In practice, donations cannot be carried out without the consent of next-of-kin, but we believe advance discussion of donation with family members is just as important as signing a card. This is your family, and they should know your wishes ahead of time. That way, when the time comes, your signed donor card, coupled with their knowledge of your wishes will help your family make their decision about donation.
Who You Should Call First Edit How to Tell Family Members
If the death is unexpected, call emergency services first. If there are no emergency services or doctor available in your area, or you are concerned or uncertain about the circumstances surrounding a death, contact your local police department or the NH State Police.
How to Tell Family Members
When the death is unexpected, the news will surely have been a shock to you – so you need to expect that reaction in those you tell. Even when the death is expected, as in a long illness, or when a loved one is in hospice care, the news may be difficult to deliver.